Male Hallstatt tunic

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Male Hallstatt tunic

Beitragvon Jeroen Zuiderwijk » 23.02.2006 14:53

I'm currently gathering information for Hallstatt period clothing, with as focal point the Netherlands, roughly 800-600BC. As I know of no clothing finds within that frame, I'll have to look outside, though as close as possible. So what sort of information is out there that I could use? I'm familiar with the situlae, which are pictured http://www.hallstattzeit.de/. Is there anything closer to this area and/or slightly older? And what is known from textiles of this period? What are the types of weft that are applicable, and what's known about dies? My preference would be wool, as I'll be using the clothes near fire a lot (forging, smelting bronze etc.).
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
 

Beitragvon Thomas Trauner » 24.02.2006 13:07

Some simple questions - some huge answers.

I guess you are plannung your own garment of a smith in the late-bronze/early iron age, right ??

(If you would like to get a complete survey on iron age clothing, I fear this would take ages :shock: )

The problem is that there are only very few original remains known for the Hallstatt-period. And they concentrate on Austria and South Germany and a few on the other side of the alps.
But what we have allows to suppose the following:

Rule Number One: Don?t rack your brains too much.

We have wool, linnen, hemp and nettle for woven clothing. Hues are coming from natural colours, of course, that means no bright colours. What was found was blue, dark brown, black, dark red, olive-green, yellow, rust red, sky-blue.

Weaving techniques are more or less the same as still used today, there is no weft-type you should avoid.

You may use a tunic and the usuall cape.
I would not recommend trousers, esp. not in your given time-span. The first prove for them is coming from the Hallstatt grave 996, a sheath is decorated with warriors wearing some of them. It dates around 500-450 BC.
You may use "leggins", made from wool. Iron-age ones where found on an Austrian glacier.

Don?t overestimate the pictures on the situlae. There is no proof that they really show genuin celtic clothing. The situlae are coming from the ethruscan side of the alps, so it it?s possible, that they show transalpine clothing.

Another problem is that the gravefinds almost exclusively refer only to the rich people. So I would not place a bet on how a smith really would look like. He may have used one or more needles to close the cape. It?s unclear till today how in early iron age the belts where closed. There is one hook out from the Hallstatt-graves which may have used for this purpose, but that?s it.
Shoes are leather, you may use a pointed type or a simple "roman" style sandal.

But there is one question, Jeroen. The Netherlands have just one find of clear Hallstatt provenience. It?s this sword-grave called "Ossen" (? I?m not completely shure of the name), first published in the thirties, then again somewhere in the fifties.

So - if you think about an "Dutch" Iron-ager, you may refer much more on bog-mummies found in the NL, as on central European Hallstatt clothing. You may have a look f.e. in: http://www.jamesmdeem.com/bogbodies.contents.htm


But don?t hesitate to ask more questions.

Thomas
Thomas Trauner
 

Beitragvon Jeroen Zuiderwijk » 24.02.2006 14:29

Thomas Trauner hat geschrieben:Some simple questions - some huge answers.

I guess you are plannung your own garment of a smith in the late-bronze/early iron age, right ??

Yup :) Early iron age in particular. For bronze age, I base my outfit on the middle bronze age finds of the Netherlands and Denmark.

(If you would like to get a complete survey on iron age clothing, I fear this would take ages :shock: )

I'd expect that. But as I don't have as much time to spend on research for my IA outfit as I did for my BA outfit, I'm looking for some general directions.

The problem is that there are only very few original remains known for the Hallstatt-period. And they concentrate on Austria and South Germany and a few on the other side of the alps.
But what we have allows to suppose the following:

Rule Number One: Don?t rack your brains too much.

We have wool, linnen, hemp and nettle for woven clothing. Hues are coming from natural colours, of course, that means no bright colours. What was found was blue, dark brown, black, dark red, olive-green, yellow, rust red, sky-blue.

Weaving techniques are more or less the same as still used today, there is no weft-type you should avoid.

But what's are the most common ones? I'm assuming 2-1 twill, fishbone and diamond patterns would be the likeliest choices.

You may use a tunic and the usuall cape.
I would not recommend trousers, esp. not in your given time-span. The first prove for them is coming from the Hallstatt grave 996, a sheath is decorated with warriors wearing some of them. It dates around 500-450 BC.
You may use "leggins", made from wool. Iron-age ones where found on an Austrian glacier.

I've no problems going without trousers :) (used to bronze age clothing). As a matter of fact, I seem to have set a trend here in Archeon in dropping pants in pre-iron age time ;)

Don?t overestimate the pictures on the situlae. There is no proof that they really show genuin celtic clothing. The situlae are coming from the ethruscan side of the alps, so it it?s possible, that they show transalpine clothing.

I figured that much. So I was hoping if some evidence was known from closer regions (clothing itself or rock art etc.).

Another problem is that the gravefinds almost exclusively refer only to the rich people. So I would not place a bet on how a smith really would look like.

Ah, but I want to portray a prosporous smith :D

He may have used one or more needles to close the cape. It?s unclear till today how in early iron age the belts where closed. There is one hook out from the Hallstatt-graves which may have used for this purpose, but that?s it.
Shoes are leather, you may use a pointed type or a simple "roman" style sandal.

We've got some good examples of iron age shoes here. I've also recently discovered that the bronze age type shoe has been continuously in use until at least the late medieval period. But I've got a good amount of leather to work with, so I may just as well make a typical iron age pair.

But there is one question, Jeroen. The Netherlands have just one find of clear Hallstatt provenience. It?s this sword-grave called "Ossen" (? I?m not completely shure of the name), first published in the thirties, then again somewhere in the fifties.

The King of Oss. His sword is my favourite iron sword of all times, and is on display in the national museum of antiquities only a few steps away from my house. It's very highly on my list of swords to have reproduced (either when I have the funds, or the experience to do it myself). I know there's some textile imprints on his sword, which AFAIK is the only evidence of textile in this period in the Netherlands. I haven't come across any detailed information regarding the nature of this textile though.

There's more similar finds from the Netherlands though. There are several Hallstatt type situlae, and also more hallstatt type sword finds. I've got an article describing another roled up iron sword found in a cremation burial in Horst-Hegelsom with an urn (, and it mentions there are several others. There's also a cremation burial including a bronze Gundlingen sword (with winged chape), from Vroendael. And aside from that, there's at least 4 Gundlingen swords found in the rivers.

So - if you think about an "Dutch" Iron-ager, you may refer much more on bog-mummies found in the NL, as on central European Hallstatt clothing.

Yeah, but they're all nude, and from late iron age/roman period. The only exception is the man of Emmer-Erfscheidenveen, but he's middle bronze age.


I believe I've got a dutch copy of this book (I've got several bog body books). Unfortunately they're very poor in attaching dates to the finds. I've only got a table that shows the dates in BP, but it's a lot of going backwards and forwards in these books to figure out which belongs to which. And most interesting ones have the dates missing alltogether. Very frustrating! :x
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
 

Beitragvon Kelvin Wilson » 25.02.2006 21:11

They found probable clothing pins in the Oss 'royal' grave too. Large ones, if my memory serves me well...

This book is sure to tell you more: http://www.matrijs.com/titelpag.asp?rec ... 5345-233-8


Kelvin Wilson
Kelvin Wilson
 

Beitragvon Jeroen Zuiderwijk » 27.02.2006 12:13

Kelvin Wilson hat geschrieben:They found probable clothing pins in the Oss 'royal' grave too. Large ones, if my memory serves me well...

This book is sure to tell you more: http://www.matrijs.com/titelpag.asp?rec ... 5345-233-8


Kelvin Wilson


Already have it :) Unfortunately the book doesn't go into details regarding the finds as much as I'd like. It's not more then an overal description.
Jeroen Zuiderwijk
 


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